All posts tagged: Bratislava

The Week that Was (Part Five)

This week included a walk through Cintorín pri Kozej Bráne, a cemetery located close to the old town in Bratislava’s Palisady neighborhood. Palisady is one of the prettiest neighborhoods in Bratislava mainly due to its grand villas. The cemetery is open to the public but no longer in use. It was created as a response to Emperor Joseph II decree that burials where no longer allowed in inhabited parts of the city in order to protect the water wells.  Burials now had to take place outside the city walls.  A large part of the cemetery is unkept. It being overgrown adds to the atmosphere but at the same time, it made me sad to see it in such decay. On a few graves, I found these lovely stone carved embellishments (not sure what else to call them) and they touched me with their simplicity and symbolism. I especially love the one above of the two hands holding each other and of the ouroboros encircling the butterfly. Pálffy Palace is one of four historical buildings in …

Kostol Zvestovania Pána

The oldest existing religious building in Bratislava’s Old Town is Kostol Zvestovania Pána, a Franciscan church constructed in the 13th century and consecrated by King Andrew III of Hungary. Originally built in the Gothic style, in the 17th century it was transformed into a Renaissance church and into a Baroque church in the 18th century. This church is home to a rare relic – the torso of Saint Reparat who lays in what looks like a glass coffin. His skeleton is dressed in the most beautiful red velvet embroidered cloth pulled tightly over his bones. He was a deacon and a Christian martyr who died in the 4th century and is known as the patron saint of those wanting to change their life for the better. On the opposite side of this glass coffin is a stone passageway that leads into the adjacent Chapel of Saint John the Evangelist. Built in the late 14th century, this chapel is considered to be one of the finest examples of Gothic architecture in Bratislava. On its back wall …

The Week that Was (Part Four)

This week was spent sharing all that I love about Bratislava with friends who came to visit. We walked the streets of Bratislava’s Old Town, weaving in and out of churches, searching for old books and engravings.  I also discovered places that I hadn’t seen before. Here are some images I took of the week that was.  This week was the first time I got a chance to see inside Bratislava’s magnificent Baroque Trinity Church. What first caught my attention was the trompe-l’oeil fresco ceiling painted by Italian painter Antonio Galli Bibiena. I was then moved by the massive alter with its altarpiece depicting St. John of Matha and St. Felix of Valois ransoming prisoners from Turkish capture. The church was sanctified in 1727 and belongs to the Trinitarian Order. This little bookshop is one of my favorites in Bratislava. The antique books sold here are carefully curated and they don’t just sell antique books but also used books, original engravings, old maps, postcards and lovely reproduction art nouveau posters. They also have a shelf dedicated …

Historical Ondrejský Cemetery

Anyone that knows me, knows how much I enjoy exploring old cemeteries. When they asked me “Why?”, I found it difficult to answer but now I think I have found the answer. I am attracted to the spirit of a place – the genius loci which in this case can be felt in the prevailing character and atmosphere of the old cemetery. It’s quiet and calm, with tall trees; an escape from the rush of city life and it has some lovely tombstones. Established in 1784, Ondrejský cemetery is the oldest preserved cemetery in Bratislava located just behind the Greek Catholic Church. The German, Hungarian and Slovak inscriptions are a testament to Bratislava’s multicultural past.The cemetery no longer functions as a cemetery and is now a park where mothers can often be seen walking their prams.